SOFTBALL FILMING PROCEDURES


Softball videos are skill videos. Film three to four repetitions of each skill. Coaches want to see everything you are capable of doing. If you play several positions, show footage of positions that require different skills and that are not complimentary positions. For example, short stop and 2nd base as well as 3rd base and 1st base are complimentary positions. The player playing those positions use the same skills. Just show one of the complimentary positions, not both. Film fielding and throwing the ball independently. The entire video should be 5 to 10 minutes.

Live game footage of the pitcher is the only game footage valuable to the college coaches. The live footage segment should be attached behind the skill video segment to give the college coaches the option of viewing it or not viewing it.

Introduction
The player should give their name, high school, graduation date, GPA, SAT and ACT scores, Class Rank, positions played on high school team, very brief description of high school honors, travel team name and positions played on the travel team.
 
 

Hitting

Film from the side opposite of the batters box, facing the batter as they are in their stance with a close view. This view shows the mechanics of the swing.

Film from behind the batter. This view shows mechanics and placement of the hit ball.  

Bunting

Sacrifice Bunt: Film from the side opposite of the batters box, facing the batter as they are in their stance with a close view.

Drop Bunt

Drag Bunt

Slap Bunt  

Base Running

Home to first on contact.

Home to home on contact.  

Sliding

Film the player running from 1st base and sliding into 2nd base.

Film different slides that the player is capable of performing.  

Pitchers

Fastball from the side. This is a mechanics view.

Pitches from behind the pitcher, side of the pitcher,side of the catcher and from behind the catcher. These views should show the placement and movement of the pitches.

Show 3 to 5 of each pitch from each angle.

Pitcher alternating opposite pitches, i.e. drop and rise ball; curve and screw ball and fastball and change. This demonstrates control of the different pitches.

Pitcher fielding bunts, grounders and flys from the rubber and throwing to 1st base.  

Catcher (in full equipment)

Catching different pitches from a pitcher

Blocking balls in the dirt

Fielding pop-ups

Fielding bunts and throwing to 1st base

Receiving a throw and blocking the plate

Pick-offs at 1st base

Throw-downs to 2nd base.  

Corner Fielders (1st and 3rd)

Field bunts and throw to 1st base

Field grounders hit directly at you and to the sides. Throw to 2nd baseman covering the base.

Field line drives and flys hit directly at you and to the sides.

Receiving throws on target and in the dirt.

At 3rd , throwing to 1st after fielding grounders or line drives.  

Middle Infielders (SS and 2nd )

Fielding grounders hit directly at you and to the sides.

Fielding line drives and flys hit directly to you and to the sides.

Fielding Texas Leaguers in the grass.

Throwing to 1st after fielding grounders or line drives.

Fielding and tossing to the player covering 2nd base on a double play.

Receiving the toss at 2nd base and throwing to 1st base on a double play.

At 2nd, covering and receiving throws at 1st base on a bunt.  

Outfielders

Fielding grounders, line drives and flys hit directly at you, to the side, behind and in front.

Throwing to 2nd base after fielding the ball.

Throwing to 3rd base after fielding the ball.

 Throwing to home after fielding the ball.  

Example of an Introduction

Hi, my name is Larissa Treybig. I attend Fort Bend Stephen F. Austin High School and plan to graduate in May, 2000. I have a 4.09 GPA on a 6.0 scale. I scored a 1010 on my SAT and a 22 on my ACT. I am ranked in the top 35 % of my class.

I am a pitcher for my high school team. I was selected to the 20-5A All-District and Herald Coaster All-Area Softball team as a pitcher in 2000. My travel team is the Cy-Fair Intruders. I also pitch and play outfielder for the Intruders.

Thank you for viewing my video.


Baseball videos are combination skill videos and either game or hi-light videos. For the skill portion, film three to four repetitions of each skill. Coaches want to see everything you are capable of doing. If you play several positions, show footage of positions that require different skills and that are not complimentary positions. For example, short stop and 2nd base as well as 3rd base and 1st base are complimentary positions. The player playing those positions use the same skills. Just show one of the complimentary positions, not both. Film fielding and throwing the ball independently. The entire video should be 5 to 10 minutes.  

Please
click here to see a Windows Media Player Movie of a baseball skills video from College Sports Exposure.

Live game footage of the pitcher is the only game footage valuable to the college coaches. This live footage should be added behind the skill video segment to give the college coaches the option of viewing it or not viewing it.

Pick hi-lights from the game footage of other players that are not pitchers.

Introduction
The player should give their name, high school, graduation date, GPA, SAT and ACT scores, Class Rank, positions played on high school team, very brief description of high school honors, travel team name and positions played on the travel team. For example:

Hi, my name is Ryan Bennett. I am a 17-year-old senior at Humble High School.   We are a 5A school  I will graduate in May 2003.  My GPA is 3.2.  I am ranked   230 out of 760 in my class.  I took the SAT on Dec. 7.   I am 6' 160 lbs and play Catcher for Humble High School My summer/ fall and winter team I play Catcher, 2nd, 3rd and right field for Texas Pride.  In the 2002 Baseball season, I played over 105 games.   Thanking for viewing my video.

Hitting

Live pitching is preferred over a pitching machine.

Film from the side opposite of the batters box, facing the batter as they are in their stance with a close view. This view shows the mechanics of the swing.

Film from behind the batter. This view shows mechanics and placement of the hit ball.  

Base Running

180 foot dash on a track or the baseball field.  

Sliding

Film the player running from 1st base and sliding into 2nd base.

Film different slides that the player is capable of performing.  

Pitchers

Fastball from the side. This is a mechanics view.

Pitches from behind the pitcher. These views should show the placement and movement of the pitches.

Show 3 to 5 of each pitch from each angle.

Pitcher fielding bunts, grounders and flys from the rubber and throwing to 1st base.  

Catcher (in full equipment)

Catch fastballs and curve balls from a pitcher

Blocking balls in the dirt

Fielding pop-ups

Fielding bunts and throwing to 1st base

Receiving a throw and blocking the plate

Pick-offs at 1st base

Throw-downs to 2nd base.  

Corner Fielders (1st and 3rd)

Field bunts and throw to 1st base

Field grounders hit directly at you and to the sides. Throw to 2nd baseman covering the base.

Field line drives and flys hit directly at you and to the sides.

Receiving throws on target and in the dirt.

At 3rd , throwing to 1st after fielding grounders or line drives.  

Middle Infielders (SS and 2nd )

Fielding grounders hit directly at you and to the sides.

Fielding line drives and flys hit directly to you and to the sides.

Fielding Texas Leaguers in the grass.

Throwing to 1st after fielding grounders or line drives.

Fielding and tossing to the player covering 2nd base on a double play.

Receiving the toss at 2nd base and throwing to 1st base on a double play.

At 2nd, covering and receiving throws at 1st base on a bunt.  

Outfielders

Fielding grounders, line drives and flys hit directly at you, to the side, behind and in front.

Throwing to 2nd base after fielding the ball.

Throwing to 3rd base after fielding the ball.

Throwing to home after fielding the ball.  

BASEBALL FILMING PROCEDURES

Baseball videos are combination skill videos and either game or hi-light videos. For the skill portion, film three to four repetitions of each skill. Coaches want to see everything you are capable of doing. If you play several positions, show footage of positions that require different skills and that are not complimentary positions. For example, short stop and 2nd base as well as 3rd base and 1st base are complimentary positions. The player playing those positions use the same skills. Just show one of the complimentary positions, not both. Film fielding and throwing the ball independently. The entire video should be 5 to 10 minutes.  

Please
click here to see a Windows Media Player Movie of a baseball skills video from College Sports Exposure.

Live game footage of the pitcher is the only game footage valuable to the college coaches. This live footage should be added behind the skill video segment to give the college coaches the option of viewing it or not viewing it.

Pick hi-lights from the game footage of other players that are not pitchers.

Introduction
The player should give their name, high school, graduation date, GPA, SAT and ACT scores, Class Rank, positions played on high school team, very brief description of high school honors, travel team name and positions played on the travel team. For example:

Hi, my name is Ryan Bennett. I am a 17-year-old senior at Humble High School.   We are a 5A school  I will graduate in May 2003.  My GPA is 3.2.  I am ranked   230 out of 760 in my class.  I took the SAT on Dec. 7.   I am 6' 160 lbs and play Catcher for Humble High School My summer/ fall and winter team I play Catcher, 2nd, 3rd and right field for Texas Pride.  In the 2002 Baseball season, I played over 105 games.   Thanking for viewing my video.

Hitting

Live pitching is preferred over a pitching machine.

Film from the side opposite of the batters box, facing the batter as they are in their stance with a close view. This view shows the mechanics of the swing.

Film from behind the batter. This view shows mechanics and placement of the hit ball.  

Base Running

180 foot dash on a track or the baseball field.  

Sliding

Film the player running from 1st base and sliding into 2nd base.

Film different slides that the player is capable of performing.  

Pitchers

Fastball from the side. This is a mechanics view.

Pitches from behind the pitcher. These views should show the placement and movement of the pitches.

Show 3 to 5 of each pitch from each angle.

Pitcher fielding bunts, grounders and flys from the rubber and throwing to 1st base.  

Catcher (in full equipment)

Catch fastballs and curve balls from a pitcher

Blocking balls in the dirt

Fielding pop-ups

Fielding bunts and throwing to 1st base

Receiving a throw and blocking the plate

Pick-offs at 1st base

Throw-downs to 2nd base.  

Corner Fielders (1st and 3rd)

Field bunts and throw to 1st base

Field grounders hit directly at you and to the sides. Throw to 2nd baseman covering the base.

Field line drives and flys hit directly at you and to the sides.

Receiving throws on target and in the dirt.

At 3rd , throwing to 1st after fielding grounders or line drives.  

Middle Infielders (SS and 2nd )

Fielding grounders hit directly at you and to the sides.

Fielding line drives and flys hit directly to you and to the sides.

Fielding Texas Leaguers in the grass.

Throwing to 1st after fielding grounders or line drives.

Fielding and tossing to the player covering 2nd base on a double play.

Receiving the toss at 2nd base and throwing to 1st base on a double play.

At 2nd, covering and receiving throws at 1st base on a bunt.  

Outfielders

Fielding grounders, line drives and flys hit directly at you, to the side, behind and in front.

Throwing to 2nd base after fielding the ball.

Throwing to 3rd base after fielding the ball.

Throwing to home after fielding the ball.  

FOOTBALL FILMING PROCEDURES

It is important to submit a football video to the college coaches that features your son's football skills.  Football videos that are a combination of high-light and game film is the best way to emphasize your son's skills.  The football video should start with an introduction.  The high-light portion should be about 5 minutes long. The high-light should also show the player lining up and finishing the play.  

Click here on to see a Windows Media Player Movie of football highlights from College Sports Exposure. 

College Sports Exposure utilizes two techniques to emphasize your son's football skills to the college coach.  It uses
slow motion so that the good plays stay on the T.V. screen longer when the coaches view the video. College Sports Exposure also can mark your son so that the coach can identify the player immediately and focus on him and not the surrounding players. 

College Sports Exposure recommends filming the football games with two cameras so the footage is in pro-cut format.

Many high schools video their games so they can evaluate the performance of their team or the play.  Therefore, they are
not focusing on a individual player.  As a consequence, many scenes may show a portion of the line where the player is not even visible, especially if they are a linebacker or defensive back.  Players get these game videos, copy them and mail them to the college coach.  How can a college coach make an assessment of the player when he is not even in the picture!  A video should be filmed with the prospective player in every scene.

Many high school film with VHS equipment. College Sports Exposure films the games on digital film which is a higher quality.  The high coaches usually use youth to film the high school videos.  Many times they zoom in on the players or team too much.  As a consequence, the whole play is not viewed.

In some cases, a football player's skills are not showcased with hi-lights.  For example,
a passing quarterback might quarterback for a high school team running the wishbone offense.  A skills video is the best way to emphasize his passing skills.
  Click here on the to see a Windows Media Player Movie of a quarterback's skills video.

Professional Football

College Sports Exposure provides a football agent service if you do not have an agent.
If you already have a football agent, College Sports Exposure can film and edit your  football skill/ game hi-light video and design and print a player guide or manuscript for your football agent.  

Before attending a combine or try-out for a Professional Football team, it is best to mail them a skills/ game hi-light video and a manuscript of your college career.  Please
click here to see  a Introduction and skills video of Dio Hill who is a University of Alabama Birmingham defensive back.  Please click here to view Dio Hill's college hi-light video.  The game footage should be film in pro-cut format.

Youth Football

College Sports Exposure also films youth football games and burn them onto a DVD.  The youth football team coaches use the game DVDs to help improve their players.  The games can be highlighted and given to the player's at the end of the year as
end-of-year souvenirs so they can remember the season.  Player introductions and practices can also be filmed and edited for the souvenir packages. The following streaming videos illustrate some of these souvenir packages.


VOLLEYBALL FILMING PROCEDURES

Volleyball videos are usually about 20 minutes long. 

Please
click here to see a Windows Media Player Movie of a volleyball skills video of a Defensive Specialist from College Sports Exposure.

Introduction -- The video should start with a brief introduction by the player where she gives her name, height, positions, academic information, high school, travel teams, years played and awards.  Most importantly, the player also gives her uniform number or a brief description of herself or attire, i.e. pony tail, ankle brace, etc.   The uniform number and player description helps the coach identify the prospective player in the video.  

Skill Segment -- College coaches prefer volleyball videos that show both a skill and game segment.  The skill segment should show 5 to 10 repetitions of the player free ball passing, serve receive passing, setting, serving, blocking footwork and attacking different sets.  The entire court should be shown when filming serving so the coach can view the player's ability to serve to different areas of the court.  

Some coaches like the player to approach jump to a basketball goal.  This gives them an indication of how high she can touch.  

Game Segment -- The game segment is un-edited footage so that the coach can see how the player reacts in a game.  The coaches doesn't want perfect footage because they want to know what happens when she or the team makes a mistake as well as when she and team are successful.

TENNIS FILMING PROCEDURES

Some coaches want five to ten minutes of the strokes, some want a match and other coaches want both the strokes and the match.  To satisfy all the coaches the best format for a tennis video is a short introduction, five to ten minutes of the strokes and a match.

The player should introduce himself or herself, their high school, GPA, SAT score, rank, USTA ranking, highlights of their tennis qualifications, their goals and what they are looking for in a college in the introduction.

The strokes should include some forehands, backhands, serves, return of serve, net game, volleys & movement.  It the player has some good velocity on their serves, College  Sports Exposure can radar the speed and show the reading.  

The match portion doesn't have to be a whole match.  Four to six games, or an hour of the match is adequate.  The ideal match is a match where the player is challenged on the court.

Please
click here here to see a Windows Media Player Movie of tennis strokes from College Sports Exposure

BASKETBALL FILMING PROCEDURES


The most effective basketball videos are a combination of a
hi-light and game video.  A resume should accompany the video.

The video should begin with a short introduction.  The introduction can be live or it can be a still or moving picture of the player with the name of the player, uniform number, height, vertical leap, graduation date or classification, high school honors, address, phone number and e-mail address scrolled across the scene.

The hi-light portion of the video should be about 5-6 minutes long.  It should show clips of offense, defense, rebounding and running the floor.  College Sports Exposure has
slow-motion capability which helps to emphasize select scenes. For example, if a player jumps in slow-motion, the air gap under their feet is emphasized. The hi-light portion can have music or no music.

Please
click here to see a Windows Media Player Movie of a basketball hi-lights video from College Sports Exposure.  The video is best viewed from a clarity point of view at 100 %.

The purpose of the hi-light portion is to encourage the college coach to watch the game portion.  In basketball, a good player may not touch the ball for 5 or 10 minutes because there are 9 other players on the court, 2 referees and time-outs.  College basketball coaches have told College Sports Exposure that if they don't see the player making a contribution early in the video they will turn it off and look at another!

The game portion of the video shows an entire game.  Coaches like to see the time-outs, half-times and wasted time before the administration of free throws edited out so that the video is more entertaining to view.  The game portion shows the good plays with the bad plays.  The game portion allows the coach to evaluate how the player handles the transition between offense and defense. Coaches do not want music on the game portion.  They prefer to listen to the game and hear what is going on during the game.

Many high schools video their games.  Most of these high schools use outdated VHS camcorders.  College Sports Exposure films the games on digital film which is a higher quality.  The high coaches usually use youth to film the high school videos.  Many times they zoom in on the players too much and miss the targets the passes are going to and the transitions from offensive to defense. 

College Sports Exposure also marks the player with a dot. Dot marking insure that the colleges coaches spend their time viewing the proper player and not a teammate.

SOCCER FILMING PROCEDURES

The video should be accompanied with a resume that gives the season statistics, record, player's name, address, and phone number, and the name of the coach and the coaches phone number.

Soccer videos consist of an introduction, highlights and a game.  The highlights should be about 5 minutes long. They are useful to the college coach when they haven't seen a player play live.  If they see a prospect that can help their program after viewing the video, then they make special arrangements to see the player in live action. 

Please
click here to view a Windows Media Player Movie of a soccer hi-lights video of a forward from College Sports Exposure.  Please click here to view a Windows Media Player Movie of a soccer skills video of a goal keeper, and click on to view a Windows Media Player Movie of a soccer hi-lights video of a goal keeper.

In Texas, there is only one Division I Men’s College Soccer program; i.e. SMU.  As a consequence, it is critical for talented high school boys to advertise their soccer talents with a video to Division I Men’s programs outside of the state of Texas.  Evaluate your State’s colleges.  Your state may have a similar situation.

Introduction -- The video should start with a brief introduction by the player where the gives their name, height, positions, academic information, high school, travel teams, years played and awards.  Most importantly, the player also gives their uniform number and  a brief description of  themselves or attire, i.e. pony tail, ankle brace, etc.   The uniform number and player description helps the coach identify the prospective player in the video.  

Game Segment  -- The full field game segment consist of about 14 to 15 plays or scenes from two or three games.  A scene should show the player getting in position to receive the ball, what the player does with it and the result of a play.  The technical ability of the player, i.e. dribbling, passing, shooting, tackling, trapping and other skills should be shown.  The player’s uniform number should be titled onto the first scene to help the coach identify the player.  

Small Sided Game Segment  -- In place of a full field game, some coaches are content to see a five minute segment of the player in a small sided game, i.e. 5 vs 5 or 6 vs. 6.  This could be filmed at a practice session.

Goalkeeping -- Goalkeeping videos are a combination skill and game Hi-light video because plays usually ends in the keeper’s hands.  The skill portion

.GOLF FILMING PROCEDURES

Golf videos are skill videos.  Usually the videos are 3-5 minutes long. An introduction where the player introduces themselves is optional.  

A variety of shots are filmed from the back, front and a side angle.  The variety of shots filmed include the player's full swing (2-3 times), putting stroke, a pitch shot from distances of approximately 40 to 70 yards and a few chip shots.   The full swing 
should be shown in slow motion, so that the coach can see where the player is at the top and at impact. 

Please
click here to see a Windows Media Player Movie of a golf skills video from College Sports Exposure

FIELD HOCKEY FILMING PROCEDURES

Field Hockey videos consist of an introduction, skills portion and a game.  The player should introduce themselves and talk about why they like field hockey and why they wish to play field hockey in college.  The high school hockey coach can introduce themselves and discuss the player's field hockey and academic qualifications.

The skills portion can include the "Box Agility", "M Agility", "Grapevine Agility", "Zig Zag Run", ball control dribbling, passing, 1 vs 1 attack, 1 vs 1 defense, 2 vs 1 attack, 1 vs 2 defense and passing and shooting drills in practice.

A full game should be added after the skills portion.  It is helpful if the player is marked.  
 

ICE HOCKEY FILMING PROCEDURES

Ice Hockey videos for field players are game videos.  An introduction is not necessary.  The player’s uninterrupted play during their shift should be edited into their video.  A letter from the player and resume should be included with the video.

Goalie videos are hi-light videos. Please click on the camera to play a goalie hi-light video.  For goalies, edit all their saves, not just their good ones.  Also, edit them playing the puck behind the net as well.   A letter from the player and resume should be included with the video.

GYMNASTIC FILMING PROCEDURES

Gymnastics Video should be 3 to 5 minutes long.  It should consist of an Introduction, hi-lights of skills in competition and the skills the gymnast is training on. The video footage and skills should be filmed and edited professionally so the gymnast can impress the college coaches.  Music is fine, but most coaches just fast forward through the music and gadgets on the video. Click on the to see a Windows Media Player Movie of a gymnastics skills video.

Introduction -- There should be a Brief Introduction with the gymnast speaking about themselves.   They should mention their name, where they train and compete, when they plan to graduate, academic information, what level they compete at and who their coaches are.  There can be something that scroll downs with their birthday and security number.  

Skills in Competition --  The skills in competition is a hi-light of three or four scenes from each event (competitive vault, balance beam, etc.)  they compete in.  This is filmed in competition and not at practice. It is footage from a competition that they participated in during the past year and not when they were in the 9th grade.  The quality of the video needs to be very good, i.e. up close (not back in the stands somewhere) so the college coach can see the player and skills and not blurred footage.  

Skills Training On -- The second segment are the skills that the player is working on but are not quite competition ready.  These are skills that the player is working on with the coach and spotting may be necessary.

Once the top 5 or 6 players are identified, the coach usually calls them and asks them for their more recent competitive footage.


WATER POLO FILMING PROCEDURES  Water Polo videos are either game videos or hi-light videos or both.  The athlete should be identified by cap number.  The hi-lights should consist of offensive plays, defensive plays, and transition plays.  The game should be against a top contender. An introduction can be included.  The athlete can introduce them self and state what game is being filmed, a little about the team, what they are trying to do and a little about the opponents.

CHEERLEADING FILMING PROCEDURES  Cheerleading videos are used to select cheerleaders for try-outs. Since the competition for the try-out spots is so intense, it is best to get the video footage filmed and edited professionally.

Introduction or Interview -- Candidate introduces herself, academics, family ties to the University, reason for trying out to be a cheerleader at the University and gymnastics and cheerleading background.

Leading a Cheer
-- Film the candidate at a football or basketball game or pep rally to show candidate's ability to lead a Fight Song, cheer or sideline chant.

Flips, Tumbling & Stunts -- Film the candidate performing a standing backspring, standing back tuck, backhandspring backtuck, tumbling pass, toss low torch with reverse cradle,toss lib, cradle dismount, toss stretch and optional stunts and dismounts.

EQUESTRIAN FILMING PROCEDURES

Equestrian videos are 15 to 20 minutes long. The rider is filmed going through a typical lesson or practice.  If the prospective student rides western, they should show western pleasure on a rail, horsemanship patterns and reining. If the prospective student rides English, they should show any equitation on the flat and over fences if they jump.  The video should show the rider's body position; i.e. leg angle, arm angle and upper body.  The video should show the rider on more than one horse and on horses varying in skill level.  The rider's attire should be fitted clothing, proper boots, shirt with sleeves and tucked in, a belt and no chaps.

A resume should accompany the video. The resume should describe the rider's experience and accomplishments.  Also, the resume should provide a brief description of the horse's experience.